Sunday, November 21, 2010

More On Hock Sores

I've been doing some more research about hock sores.  I've learned that one thing I've been doing is probably counterproductive - I've been putting various ointments or Vasaline on the sore, but it seems that what is needed is for the wound to form a protective callus and the ointments inhibit that by softening the skin - apparently crusty is the way to go.  I may put a piece of duct tape or a surgical bandage over it to give it a chance to crust over.

I'm also going to put more soaked pellets in his stall today - the deeper bedding will help (although it makes the stall harder to clean) - with our bedding it's the hard, not yet broken down pellets that may be causing the problem.

And I've found an interesting product on-line - this woman apparently was dissatisfied with available products (most of the reviews I've seen for the hock boots that are widely available say that they don't fit well, aren't durable and don't stay on) and designed her own hock boots - these look pretty well-designed and durable to me.  I'm going to try to call her Monday and see if I can get a pair.

In all my years with horses, I've never had one with hock sores - our Lily used to rub the hair off the front of her front pasterns from lying down on the hard ground, but she never got sores.

22 comments:

  1. Glad you found out how to treat it. It's good to know these things! Good luck with getting it cleared up.

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  2. Have you tried MicroTek spray? Great stuff that allows wounds to scab.

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  3. Those hock boots/pads look like they would stay on but I wonder if they would rub and exacerbate the problem.

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. Bonnie seems to almost always have some sort of small abrasion on the outside of her hock, but never anything that appears like bed sore or something that would cause me worry. They've always crusted over and healed. I take care to keep them clean when she gets them. but but don't scrap so far as to make it raw. Just get the loose stuff off.

    I think my horses know how to get anything I put on them off so I gave up with boots, bandages etc.

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  6. Kate, I use Wonder Dust on the small scrapes and cuts that my horses get. It really works well and protects the wound as well. You just shake the powder on and leave it alone.

    Dan

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  7. Hi Kate-

    You have lots of good suggestions here already - I'll add one more to the pot...

    I have recently tried Veterycin. It is a spray that promotes healing by increasing oxygenation to wound areas. Not greasy or irritating... it seems just like water and comes in a spray bottle.

    Kind of pricey but I have heard nothing but good things about it... worked well and quickly on a recent tick bite.

    Good luck :)

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  8. Those look handy
    My mare's usually show up, in the summer, when outside 24-7.
    Pantz..she not only gets them there...but terrible at her pasterns. She has "Cashel" wraps. Since she has been at my old place...her knees are raw...think she is stuff and older, poor girl.
    "Schriners herbal spray"had just enough dry and also healing agents.

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  9. I removed my post above because I had the anatomy wrong. Here it is, anatomy correct this time:

    My horse's problem with "bed sores" is on the point of the hock as well as the outside--the point "hair" is rubbed off--but he also rubs the hair off on his gaskin. (He's very creative).

    The hock boots you linked to would only work for part of the problem.
    His stall has rubber mats, and I bed with pine shavings. His hock rubs don't seem better or worse with the amount of bedding.

    Perplexing, this.

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  10. I think perhaps some horses just use their hocks more when they get up. I've had a few sores on my Boys over the years, but they seemed to heal pretty quickly. Not sure why or what I did that was special, but since my Boys often sleep outside, stall bedding really didn't play a big factor in the equation.

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  11. You've had a lot of good suggestions, and hopefully, Pie's sore is getting better by now. If not, here's my thought on healing him. My all time favorite product is Animalintex made by 3M. It comes in a wide roll (8"x 16") that you could easily wrap around the hock and secure with some Vetrap or any other leg wraps you had handy. It's miraculous stuff. I use it for a poultice with hoof abscesses, but it's real reason for being is to heal wounds, draw out infections and reduce inflammation. Whoever invented it is a genius! I always have a few packages on hand for leg ailments.

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  12. If you decide not to wrap it, there are a couple of things you can use to heal it; I second what Allhorsestuff said about Schreiners Herbal Solution, it comes in a spray and is easy to apply ; very effective. Essential oil of lavender will promote tissue regeneration.
    A cheap and effective one is to apply eggwhite; it's a natural antibiotic, and seals out dirt and debris. Just straight eggwhite, don't beat or stir it.

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  13. Thank you all very much for the good suggestions!

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  14. Geez, seems like horses are always coming up with something. I didn't know they could get rubs that bad in their stalls but needing to get scabs to form a callus seems odd to me. Good luck getting this figured out.

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  15. Kate, would you take a picture of this sore please , I am just wondering about a couple things and I would like to see it and its exact location

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  16. My TB mare would get hock sores. I'd just use that wonder dust usually.
    Those hock boots look a little tight in the display photo. I would worry about cutting off the circulation in their legs.

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  17. Also Gall Salve works well to help create a scab

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  18. Jimmy gets them too - can't get rid of them!!! Some horses I guess are just prone & there's not much we can do about it.

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  19. I wonder if horses can build thick calloused pads like my llamas do on their bellies, knees and hocks. Might not be very attractive, but would solve the problem of sores.


    ~Lisa

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  20. I noticed a lot of activity on my web site and found the source was this blog. I developed the Hock Shield because my friend had an arthritic horse that had dug such a deep sore on his hock that it was getting close to the bone and she couldn't find anything to protect it. I was concerned about cutting off the circulation with something too tight so I had a few vets test them to make sure they are safe, they passed the test!! Kate, I will send you a free pair for you to try. Just let me know the measurement of your horse's leg just above the hock (go to my web site for instructions) and email me your address. My email address is on my web site too. I would love for you to give them a shot. By the way, my friend's horse has healed to just a little callous.

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  21. Maybe visit poor kristen!
    Poor Laz, think she forgot about this post!

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  22. I just purchased the boots last week for my TB, with his aging his laying down habits have increased and his hock has a huge sore. I use the vetercyrin, love it. It is like magic. My only complaint about the boot is that some serous fluid that was still draining had dried to the soft material and yanked his scab off :( I hope it heals, he never had one this long.

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