Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Scout Gets Stitched and a Pie Mystery

Jill called the vet to come see Scout's cut near his eye, and fortunately our regular vet was only a few towns over and was able to come right away.  Scout was sedated, and the cut was stitched up.  The eye itself is fine, which is good news. This morning, it was a little swollen but that's all, and it should heal up well.

* * * * * *
Pie had a brief tummy ache again last evening.  He'd been in, eating his hay, and had eaten his dinner - it's just a half pound of vitamin/mineral balancer pellets with a little cocosoya oil.  After a bit, he started getting grumpy - pinning his ears at me while I was grooming, not eating his hay and looking uncomfortable.  Then he laid down (sternal, not flat) and was even groaning a bit.  But no signs of severe pain - no rolling or pawing.  Within an hour, he was fine again, and there was plenty of normal manure both before and after his episode.  His feet were warm but not hot - this seems to be how they usually are in the evening.  This morning his feet were cool.

This time there was no misfeeding to blame it on.  I'm not sure what's going on - it doesn't happen every day - the last time it happened was over a week ago when the misfeeding occurred.  It only has happened at afternoon feeding so far. And it doesn't last long, seems to resolve on its own and he's completely normal except for the brief periods when he's not.

There are a couple of possibilities - his permanent molars are still coming in, which means that his dental arcade isn't even.  He also tends to eat really fast - his appetite for dinner is good.  So perhaps he's not chewing his pellets thoroughly enough and they bother his stomach, and then his small intestine - food only stays in the stomach of the horse for about 15 minutes.  Or he could have an ulcer in either his stomach or his small intestine.  But his symptoms aren't quite typical for that - horses with ulcers usually show symptoms more consistently, particularly in the morning before feeding when the stomach is empty - but he's never yet had a problem in the morning.  But I suspect he's a stoic, so it could be ulcers. Or he could be one of those horses with some sensitivity to  weather changes involving big changes in pressure and temperature - we had a big temperature drop and big pressure increase last night.  Or all of the above.

For now, I've put him on U-Gard two times a day just as a precaution, and we may also soak his pellets so they're softer.  And then we'll just have to see what happens - horses can be a mystery sometimes.

* * * * * *
The horses are out today - wind chills are about -5C but the sun is bright.  The wind is very sharp, and I don't know how long they'll want to stay out.  Dawn is double-bagged - a heavyweight turnout over a medium weight - which should improve her staying power.  I'll check on them later.  It's good they're out now, since tomorrow will be colder and windier and they may not get out much if at all.  But spring's not too far away (I keep telling myself . . .)!

22 comments:

  1. That sounds horribly cold. Is he drinking lots of water? It really scares me when they act like that--hope you figure it out.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I hope it turns out to be something simple with Pie, like these harsh weather changes. I know many of us are just "sick" of the winter this time around.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I just thought of something--I don't know if this would help Pie, but some people make warm mash for their horses during the really cold months. I have a friend who's an old horsewoman--she swears by them for some of her horses who are prone to stomach problems. I can't remember what was in them, but warm water for sure--seems like flax--whole oats....

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good news about the eye. I agree that horses can be a mystery. But they can be like us, I guess. Sometimes we don't feel right and then we're OK after awhile.

    Hopefully this will all settle down after the weather gets better.

    Dan

    ReplyDelete
  5. We had a pony at my last barn choke because he gulped his food down. Afterwards his feed was soaked and there were big round river rocks in his feed tub.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Oh Spring... how I long for it. I hope your little Pie buddy gets better soon and all is quickly resolved.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Glad to hear that Scout's eye itself wasn't injured and he should be fine.

    As for Pie, he's a mystery that I'm sure you will figure out. I had a horse who gas coliced every time there was a change in pressure due to the weather. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  8. U gard and soaked feed might just make the difference. Could be any of the causes you mention. Either way, I hope it all resolves soon.

    Good news about the eye too. Glad the vet was able to come so quickly and take care of it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Flash used to do the same thing. He would lay down and groan but not thrash or otherwise act colicy. He wouldn't want to eat. He was very grumpy. We worried ourselves sick. We ended up doing a course of ulcer meds just to see if it helped - and it really did. He rarely has the episodes anymore. ...something to stick in the back of your mind if this continues with Pie.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm constantly amazed by what I learn by reading your posts! I hadn't even heard the term "dental acrade" before today. Thanks for sharing!
    *off to find out more about equine dental*

    ReplyDelete
  11. I hope Pie feels much better soon. No matter what's going on, I bet he'll feel better when this nasty weather is a memory. I know I will1

    ReplyDelete
  12. I hate that Pie had another tummy ache... perhaps he is just eating too quickly? I have to feed AJ little bits of a time at first or he'll bolt his food and take HUGE mouthfuls at a time. Once he gets a little in his mouth, though, he's ok. I agree that maybe wetting it a bit could help.

    Horses are such a mystery!! Hopefully he's better soon.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hope you get Pie's troubles all figured out. The only thing I would say is to make sure he's drinking lots of warm water. Hopefully the U-gard works. Maybe some probiotics would help too. I hate it when horses aren't feeling good!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I hope you get the problem figured out with Pie. If horses could talk it would be so much easier.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Glad Scuot got stitched up quickly .Pie sounds a little like my neices horse Eurus , on and off tummy trouble . Put him on Diamond yeat (a brewers yeast ) and he seemed to resolve. Probiotics/Prebiotics can be helpgul with improving gut function

    ReplyDelete
  16. Dang..that snowy photo of your header is amazing!!!

    Scout, dude, what is it with your head and face??I'm so happy to hear it is noit too serious and the eye was spared..poor Jill!
    And Pie...so happy too that he recovered quickly..who knows, sometimes they can be so tempermental. Soaking will be more moisture, that can't hurt in the cold you guys are still having.
    Hang in, that ground hog better have been right!

    ReplyDelete
  17. We have a chunk of brick in Max's bucket as he tends to bolt his feed; slows him down quite nicely. Ulcers can be kind of tricky sometimes; I'm right there with you on the better safe than sorry route :o)

    ReplyDelete
  18. I hope you figure out what is causing Pie's uncomfortable afternoons. It will be interesting to see if his symptoms subside as spring approaches. These extremes can't be good for anyone.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hope you get Pie sorted - I really wish horses could just explain what the problem is - it would make life SOOO much easier!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Everyone has pretty much already suggested anything I could have suggested. Soaking his regular feed (not a bran mash), putting rocks in his feed bucket, probiotics, etc.

    The only other thing I can think of is his bucket. Does he eat out of one of those corner stall bucket feeder things (so technical right lol)? Maybe try a large bucket (like the end of a 55 gallon drum) on the floor, like what I'm using for Chrome with rocks in it to slow him down and have his head and neck in a more natural eating position. It might be worth a shot just in case he's swallowing air or something when he's bolting his food (which would cause gas right??).

    I'm glad he feels better. And I'm glad Scout is okay. Please keep us updated and stay warm!!

    ReplyDelete
  21. You've probably already had a ton of good advice, but one thing you might consider is his stall neighbors. My dad had my show pony stalled for a month in one place, not knowing the entire time that as soon as we left he'd fight all night long with the horse next to him. They never fought while we were there. How we found out was my dad was feeding and BAM, my pony kicked him and knocked him out--it was sudden and completely unlike him. Thankfully Dad was ok, but after someone there at the stable came and "saved" him they asked Dad if he knew that the two horses fought every second we weren't there, and that's most likely why my pony kicked. We moved him and didn't have any trouble after that ever again.

    Just something to think about--you never know what's going on at the stable when you're not there....

    ReplyDelete
  22. Poor Pie. I'm glad you pick up on his signs of something bothering him. He does seem to be a stoic type which would make it easy to miss. Hopefully it will be resolved. I hate those tummy issues. Btw, we've been having good luck with adding Aloe liquid to Laz's beet pulp for tummy soothing. He sucks it down and has been a happy boy. Not a cure, just a preventative.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for commenting - we appreciate it. No spam or marketing comments will be published.