Sunday, February 20, 2011

Shoeless

Well, not quite.  Dawn lost her left front shoe on Friday.  When I was grooming her that morning before I turned her out, I noticed that she had slightly sprung one corner of the shoe, not so much that I had to take it off and the side clips were still in place.  But the "dry" lot she was in on Friday was full of shoe-sucking mud, or otherwise slippery, and Dawn is prone to acrobatics, so the shoe was missing that evening.  She's walking comfortably, if a bit lop-sided, but the farrier will probably be out next week.

I've spent a lot of time over the past several days looking for the shoe - the dry lot is a little more than an acre.  I did find the oakum stuffing out of her foot - it looks sort of brown and hairy - which is odd since it's about the color of the mud - I noticed the hairiness.  She must have lost it after the shoe since there was some pine tar between her foot and the oakum.  No shoe anywhere in the vicinity.  When I'm looking for a shoe, early morning and late afternoon are best, as the low angle of the sun highlights things.  I'm usually pretty good at finding shoes - if they're lost in grass I ride a horse to look - I follow a deliberate pattern to be sure I cover all the square footage.

This morning I was out there looking one more time - those shoes with borium spots are expensive and take the farrier a long time to make when he's here.  Pie came marching up to me (geldings are in that dry lot today), ears pricked and with an inquisitive expression on his face:

"Whatcha doing?"

"I'm looking for Dawn's shoe."  I spoke out loud to him - I usually do when I talk to my horses. I rubbed his face and neck and gave him a hug around his neck.

"What's a shoe?" [He's never worn shoes.]

"It's about this big [holding hands apart], it's sort of round, and it's shiny around the edge and black in the middle [the snow pad].  If you see it let me know."

He headed off to graze - not sure if he'll follow up with me or not.

I suspect it's somewhere in the hay around the round bale - I poked around in there with no results.  I'll look again tomorrow.

20 comments:

  1. Seems to be the week of the thrown shoe.

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  2. If anyone can help find that shoe - Pie can. I believe he can do anything he puts his mind too ;) Good luck with the search!

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  3. I thought you were going to say that Pie proceeded to point at the shoe with his nose.

    Pie is a smart boy! We have one of those in Sovey. Many "Timmy's in the well" experiences with him.

    I hope Dawn fares well with one shoe!

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  4. I doubt Pie will give up the location. I tend to believe that our horses find great enjoyment and entertainment out of watching us as we have no clue what we are doing or where we are going. Maybe it is just me but my horses seem to love to watch me look silly. Good luck on your hunt.

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  5. If theres a chance of losing a shoe, mud`ll do it!......Especially that thick sticky stuff! Hope you found it.
    BTW, if it doesnt sound too ignorant of me, whats that white tower in the background of your header shot? I` see them now and again, and wonder?

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  6. Cheyenne - that's a municipal water tower. A lot of towns around here have them. It allows the town to maintain relatively constant water pressure in the pipes regardless of demand. Some private businesses have them too. Better explanation that I can give here:

    www.howstuffworks.com/water.htm

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  7. Try looking outside the pen.... sometimes they come flinging off their feet... especially with those prone to acrobatics!

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  8. Have you considered taking Dawn shoeless?

    Dan

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  9. you need a magnet. you'll be supprised at all the metal you'll find

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  10. I cannot count the hours I have spent looking for lost shoes. I too have a pretty solid search pattern I use. My "find" rate is only about 30% BEFORE the farrier comes to make a replacement and nearly 100% after he's done--although it's sometimes weeks after. The lost shoe just appears as if it's been secretly hiding for all that time.

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  11. Finding lost shoes in a huge field is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Good luck tomorrow.

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  12. Those horses probably do know exactly where that shoe is! I bet you find it--I always manage to find shoes in pastures or on the trail. We must remember this post when you find Dawn's!

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  13. Jean is right - you'll find the shoe after it is replaced, that always happens!
    I love that you have conversations with your horses. I talk to mine all of the time, too. They probably wish I'd just be quiet!

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  14. Can you borrow a metal detector from someone? That way, if it's buried in the mud you might have better success finding it. Loved the "conversation".

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  15. My fields are too big to even bother looking for a lost shoe. And that alone makes me very thankful my girls can handle their current workload (not much!) without shoes!

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  16. Try a magnet, I think we got ours at Home Depot. Carpenters use them to pick up dropped nails. I guarentee you'll find a lot more than just a shoe!!! I magnet the pasture every spring, and every spring I find more metal crap. I'm thinking of renting a metal detector this year.

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  17. It's incredible how they can get those shoes off. I remember a friend trying to pry one off and it served to remind us all of how unbelievably strong our horses are!

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  18. Good luck with finding the shoe! Little Pie such a character! and sounds like he loves his mum!

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  19. Ugh. Finding shoes can be such a pain. I hope you manage to find it. Maybe Pie will come through for you. :)

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  20. I love the metal detector idea. I have just decided every boarding barn should have one. :) Ours has a magnet. Not so great in mud.

    Totally LOVE the conversation with Pie. Because that's exactly what happens, and it's easy to picture. Thanks for sharing that part. If only we can convince our non-horsey friends/family that we are not "speaking" FOR the horse, we're relating the conversation that actually happened!

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